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Up To One In Three Kids Have Tooth Decay (Read 305 times)
whiteknight
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Up To One In Three Kids Have Tooth Decay
Jul 19th, 2019 at 3:42pm
 
Up to one in three kids have tooth decay, and sugar is to blame: experts   Sad

July 19, 2019
Sydney Morning Herald
   

“If we are talking about dental care, we need to talk about sugar.”

That’s according to Professor Marco Peres, lead author on a paper about the global public health challenge of oral diseases published in Lancet on Friday.

Tooth decay – scientifically known as dental caries – is one of the most common diseases in the world. Untreated tooth decay in adult teeth affects over one third (34.1 per cent) of the global population, according to the Lancet Series on oral health.   Sad




Associate Professor Matthew Hopcraft, chief executive of the Australian Dental Association Victorian Branch, said tooth decay rates in Australia reflected the global numbers.


“One in three kids by the age of five to six have tooth decay in their baby teeth, and 40 per cent of kids by the age of 12 to 14 have tooth decay in their adult teeth,” he said.

Professor Peres, who is based at the Menzies Health Institute Queensland and Griffith University, said we wouldn’t have tooth decay without sugar, and soft drinks are the "major source of sugar in the global diet".

“This is a big problem in this country," he said. "The consumption of sugary drinks is highest in North America, Latin America and Australasia."

Professor Hopcraft said Australian teenagers were consuming on average more than three times the recommended amount of added sugar.

“The average teenager is consuming about 20 teaspoons of added sugar a day – the World Health Organisation recommends reducing your added sugar to less than six teaspoons.”

Both experts said reducing added sugar intake with measures such as a sugar tax was key to bringing down the prevalence of tooth decay, but that faced opposition from both governments and the sugar industry.

“The history of the vast tobacco battle is happening again, now this time it’s the sugar industry,” Professor Peres said, highlighting the millions of dollars soft drink beverage companies spent lobbying the US government.

University of Sydney Professor Lisa Bero, who co-wrote a comment piece for the Lancet series, said the sugar industry's influence on dental research "has driven the dental profession to emphasise treatment rather than prevention of oral and other diseases related to sugar".

Professor Hopcraft said the role of government in measures like a tax on sugar-sweetened beverages was "really critical".

Other regulatory measures could include putting the amount of added sugar on food labels, changing the health star rating so products that are high in sugar do not receive good scores, and restricting the advertising of sugary products to children, he suggested.

“They’re sort of the roles we feel there’s room for regulation and for government to take some key action to help drive down sugar consumption, which will have huge benefits in the community around oral health,” Professor Hopcraft said.

Professor Peres said working with experts in other non-communicable diseases such as obesity and diabetes might be the key to reducing the influence of Big Sugar.

“If you fight against sugar, the benefit will be in terms of reduced obesity, diabetes, and also dental caries and tooth loss.”

However, Professor Hopcraft said there will be no solution to reducing the nation’s sugar intake without government help.

“Unfortunately the rhetoric that we tend to hear a lot of is this is all about individual responsibility, it's you deciding not to drink that can of soft drink,” he said.

“Which completely misses the point that the whole environment is being shaped by the food industry to make it really difficult for consumers to do that, and that's where food labelling and health star ratings are really important because that's a way of empowering consumers to make a healthy choice.”
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greggerypeccary
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Re: Up To One In Three Kids Have Tooth Decay
Reply #1 - Jul 19th, 2019 at 4:08pm
 

Potato chips, and orange juice - bad stuff.

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UnSubRocky
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Re: Up To One In Three Kids Have Tooth Decay
Reply #2 - Jul 19th, 2019 at 4:28pm
 
I have 5 tubes of toothpaste in the bathroom. 3 are being used for different times of the day -- obsessive compulsive. I have 3 bottles of mouthwash getting used twice a day. I have had a sudden urge to make my teeth as clean as possible.
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.JaSin.
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Re: Up To One In Three Kids Have Tooth Decay
Reply #3 - Jul 19th, 2019 at 6:27pm
 
One in Three teenagers and adults are drug/alcohol addicts.

Apparently they need pain relief to listen to music at the current Splendor in the Grass festival.

PS: The Cost of dentists stops many people from going to the Dentists. Roll Eyes
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Setanta
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Re: Up To One In Three Kids Have Tooth Decay
Reply #4 - Jul 19th, 2019 at 9:09pm
 
UnSubRocky wrote on Jul 19th, 2019 at 4:28pm:
I have 5 tubes of toothpaste in the bathroom. 3 are being used for different times of the day -- obsessive compulsive. I have 3 bottles of mouthwash getting used twice a day. I have had a sudden urge to make my teeth as clean as possible.


If you stop putting acids in your mouth to protect you from the flu, you may not need all that. Not to mention your coke addiction.
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.JaSin.
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Re: Up To One In Three Kids Have Tooth Decay
Reply #5 - Jul 19th, 2019 at 9:13pm
 
Setanta wrote on Jul 19th, 2019 at 9:09pm:
UnSubRocky wrote on Jul 19th, 2019 at 4:28pm:
I have 5 tubes of toothpaste in the bathroom. 3 are being used for different times of the day -- obsessive compulsive. I have 3 bottles of mouthwash getting used twice a day. I have had a sudden urge to make my teeth as clean as possible.


If you stop putting acids in your mouth to protect you from the flu, you may not need all that. Not to mention your coke addiction.


Agree.
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UnSubRocky
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Re: Up To One In Three Kids Have Tooth Decay
Reply #6 - Jul 19th, 2019 at 10:14pm
 
Setanta wrote on Jul 19th, 2019 at 9:09pm:
UnSubRocky wrote on Jul 19th, 2019 at 4:28pm:
I have 5 tubes of toothpaste in the bathroom. 3 are being used for different times of the day -- obsessive compulsive. I have 3 bottles of mouthwash getting used twice a day. I have had a sudden urge to make my teeth as clean as possible.


If you stop putting acids in your mouth to protect you from the flu, you may not need all that. Not to mention your coke addiction.


Yeah, I know. But, I do dilute the citrus juice before drinking. And the coca-cola addiction is not as bad as I make it out to be. The coffee drinking has brought down cola drinking by a long way.

I used to brush my teeth about once or twice a day. Always before going to bed. And usually before going out or to work. Now it is two to 3 times a day.
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Gnads
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Re: Up To One In Three Kids Have Tooth Decay
Reply #7 - Jul 20th, 2019 at 12:23pm
 
If you have a tendency to be OCD you ought be careful about mouthwash use ....

they aren't all the same and can cause problems as well as have a benefit.


Quote:
Using Mouthwash: The Cons
It may cause irritation. Mouthwashes with a high alcohol content may have strong antibacterial properties, but they can also irritate the tissues in the mouth and even make it more difficult for canker sores to heal.

It may not be safe for (accidental) consumption. Some mouthwashes contain ingredients that are harmful if accidentally swallowed. This is a big reason why mouthwash is generally not recommended for use by children under the age of six.

It may cause dry mouth. Regular or excessive use of alcohol-based mouthwashes can dry out your mouth, which can lead to tooth sensitivity, bad breath, and "even cavities".

It can mask potential oral health issues. If you suffer from chronic halitosis (aka bad breath), you may be able to mask it with regular mouthwash use. But masking a condition and effectively treating a condition are not the same thing. Chronic bad breath is a sign you should visit a dentist, not just ramp up your mouthwash usage.


https://www.rifkindental.com/blog/the-pros-and-cons-of-using-mouthwash
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UnSubRocky
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Re: Up To One In Three Kids Have Tooth Decay
Reply #8 - Jul 20th, 2019 at 4:15pm
 
I used alcohol-free mouthwash.
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Re: Up To One In Three Kids Have Tooth Decay
Reply #9 - Jul 20th, 2019 at 5:30pm
 
I remember when I was about 22 years old, I had reached a point where the fillings on my back molars had fallen out due to the decay on the molars. My brushing had been a matter of brushing the front teeth and around the sides. The insides of the teeth got a brief brush over. And the back molars got the occasional brushing.

Upon losing the filling on my right side upper molar, the remainder of the tooth had to be manually extracted over time, leaving a decaying tooth. That molar had to start getting more proper attention from brushing. One afternoon, I decided to really do something about it. I used mouthwash and left the mouthwash in my mouth for about nearly an hour. After ten minutes, the right side of my mouth, being that I had to lay in bed waiting for the active decay removal, began to go numb. Forty minutes later, I had to expel the mouthwash and inspect the damage. As days went by, no doubt I had cleaned up that side of the mouth. But the cheek on my right side was sore for a long time. And my teeth were aching for a while.

It took until the year 2008 or 2009 before I managed to get that tooth finally extracted. The student dentist found it difficult to grab hold of the remainder of the tooth for extraction. But that tooth, and the other tooth on the other side were removed. Then I had to get the bottom right molar, that had broken, extracted. But that meant an impacted bottom molar had to be taken out, too.

It is fairly obvious that my mouth is crowded with teeth. Had I had those back molars removed, in my teenage years, I would have a lot of difference in how my teeth look today.
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