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Multiculti - the politics and policy killing Oz. (Read 19181 times)
Grendel
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Multiculti - the politics and policy killing Oz.
Dec 29th, 2017 at 5:45am
 
This could have been titled - Educating Bwian or any number of LW Progs here.
But there is no educating the obsessives in denial.

So here we have a few articles proving their beliefs wrong.

Quote:
Victoria Police chief forced to admit African youth gangs a problem

The Australian
December 29, 2017
Pia Akerman

Victoria Police and the Andrews government have declared they are not afraid to call out high crime rates among African youth after a spate of violent incidents highlighted the ongoing problem and prompted renewed commitments to working with the community.

Acting chief commissioner Shane Patton yesterday distanced himself from a local superintendent who downplayed the issue after a violent attack on a sergeant who was trying to arrest an African boy accused of shop­lifting.

“The leaders in the African community readily and openly say they do have issues with a small cohort of African youth who are committing high-end crimes,” Mr Patton said.

“We acknowledge that, we don’t shy away from that at all. We will target anyone who’s involved in any criminal activity and if that’s African youths, so be it.”

Mr Patton said although only one arrest had been made, police were still pursuing other offenders among the group of more than 100 mainly South Sudanese youths who trashed a Werribee Airbnb-rented property last week and then pelted officers with rocks.

The house was spraypainted with youth-gang symbols, including a reference to the notorious Apex crime game responsible for a spate of home invasions and car thefts in the southeast suburbs. Police are also searching for a youth of African appearance who kicked an officer in the face outside Highpoint Shopping Centre on Boxing Day while another youth was being arrested for shoplifting.

While discussing the incident this week, Superintendent Therese Fitzgerald rejected suggestions of a crime problem among African youths, saying the problem was “youth crime in general”.

Police Minister Lisa Neville yesterday confirmed
African-born young men were over­represented in crime statistics
and were causing “great harm and fear in the community”.


“I am not trying to cover this up,” Ms Neville said. “It has been of significant concern to us and to Victoria Police.

“We’ve had additional investment in the gang squad (and) in intelligence measures in order to try and disrupt their behaviour.”

Ms Neville also pointed to the Monitoring and Assessment Centre, which was established in the wake of last year’s Moomba riots in which dozens of youths — some of them linked to the Apex gang — ran through Federation Square and Swanston Street brawling and wielding chairs as weapons. Officers at the centre use CCTV footage and social media data to keep check on gangs coming into the city centre.

South Sudanese youth leaders have called for authorities to do more to help African teens integrate.

Figures from the Crime Statistics Agency show Sudanese and South Sudanese people were 6.135 times more likely to have been arrested last year than offenders born in Australia and 4.8 times more likely than those born in New Zealand.

Separate reports have tracked dramatic increases in aggravated burglaries, serious assaults and car thefts committed by Sudanese-born youth between 2014 and 2017.


According to data obtained by Coalition MP Jason Wood, Sudanese-born offenders are the second most represented ethnic group behind Australians when it comes to aggravated burglaries, car thefts, and sexual offences in the 10-to-18 age group.

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Reply #1 - Dec 29th, 2017 at 5:46am
 
YES BWIAN WE IMPORT CRIME... AND NO BWIAN IT IS NOT A FIGMENT OF OUR IMAGINATIONS.
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Reply #2 - Dec 29th, 2017 at 5:59am
 
More education for deniers...

http://www.theaustralian.com.au/life/weekend-australian-magazine/to-the-supermax...

To the SuperMax

A special unit in this prison houses Australia’s most dangerous extremists. We gain rare access and discover a ticking time bomb.


Five times a day, Goulburn’s SuperMax goes quiet. The din of jail life stops as the 30-odd Muslim inmates angle their bottle-green prayer mats towards Mecca. Standing alone in their narrow cells, they raise their arms in supplication and, with eyes closed, recite the holy incantations of the Surah Al-Fatiha, the first verse of the Holy Koran and the beginning of the Muslims’ Divine Communion with God. Bismillaahir Rahmaanir Raheem. Alhamdu lillaahi Rabbil ’aalameen…

A few hundred metres away, in the general prison, dozens more inmates are doing the same thing. Under a soggy grey sky, they kneel in the exercise yard and pray as guards carrying high-powered assault rifles patrol the 5.5m-high walls around them. There’s no trouble today; there rarely is during prayers.

Out in the main prison population, religion is a source of comfort or just another diversion from the drudgery of jail life. Not so in the ­SuperMax. Here, religion remains an obsession. It is the ­reason most of the inmates were locked up and, as the years tick over on their time here, it’s what’s kept them going.

Anyone who thinks Australia does not have a problem with prison radicalisation should visit SuperMax during prayer time. They are all here. The names and faces behind a thousand headlines heralding mayhem and death. And with a handful of exceptions, the entire population of the SuperMax observes this daily ritual. They all believe the same thing: “There is no God but Allah and this is where He wants me.” For now.

When Islamic State broke through the Syrian border in June 2014, annexing northern Iraq and declaring a caliphate, Australia’s prisons filled with a new generation of Muslim extremists ensnared by the ISIS ideology of do-it-yourself violence. In ­Australia, 62 people were charged after 27 separate counter-terrorism operations in little more than two years. A problem that once lurked in mosques, chat rooms and obscure prayer halls was transferred, en masse, into the prison system. That was the good news. The bad news is they are more dangerous than they have ever been, their radical beliefs entrenched in the same system that locked them up in the first place. And soon, some of them will be up for release. A system that is supposed to remove threats from the community is, in fact, incubating them for future generations.


The first thing you notice about Goulburn’s High Risk Management Correctional Centre, to give the SuperMax its official name, is that it looks nothing like a prison. Built in 2001 in the NSW city 90km north-east of Canberra as a place to house the state’s most violent offenders, it is ­concealed behind the soaring walls and grim ­Victorian façade of Goulburn’s historic jail, a ­fortress within a fortress. The corridors are wide, the lights are bright and cherry-red doors with observation windows provide access to every cell. There is no mess hall, no shower block. No ­tattooed cons pumping iron in the yard. Common areas don’t exist in SuperMax. On some days it might be ­possible to walk the entire length of the prison without encountering a single inmate.

Glen Piazza, SuperMax’s manager of security, is our guide for this rare glimpse into Australia’s most secretive prison. Piazza is an affable 50-something who’s been working in Corrections for nearly 30 years, five in the pressure-cooker of SuperMax. He’s got a broad Australian accent and a black sense of humour. “Remember, if you get raped, it’s just jail sex,” he says, as we’re about to enter the prison. You get the feeling it’s not the first time he’s used this line.

SuperMax is divided into three units, Piazza explains. Unit Nine is where unsentenced prisoners are kept. Unit Eight holds convicted prisoners serving out long sentences up to 20 years or more. Unit Seven houses prisoners for the first 14 days of their sentence while they are being assessed. Nobody is sentenced to SuperMax. Everybody here has been sent because they were too hard to manage in other prisons or because of their link to terrorism. Thirty of the prison’s 48 inmates are here for terrorist-related offences.

We head first to Unit Nine, a horseshoe-shaped row of cells with an enclosed observation area in the middle where the prison officers huddle like soldiers in a pillbox. This is effectively a remand centre for NSW’s most dangerous men. We have been here just a few minutes and already the shouting from the banks of locked cells has begun. “Why don’t you tell them about the oppression inside SuperMax!”

In some countries, radical inmates are dispersed across the prison system, an approach that is supposed to make deradicalisation easier. But here in NSW they are grouped together, quarantined from other prisoners like patients stricken with a deadly virus. The idea is they can’t radicalise other ­prisoners and in practice it works well enough. They radicalise each other instead.
pt1
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Re: Multiculti - the politics and policy killing Oz.
Reply #3 - Dec 29th, 2017 at 6:00am
 
Note the numbers and "religion".

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« Last Edit: Dec 29th, 2017 at 6:09am by Grendel »  
 
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Reply #4 - Dec 29th, 2017 at 6:07am
 
pt2.

The names of prisoners are written on cards outside their cells along with the details of their sentence. Virtually all are of Middle Eastern background.

One of the conditions of our visit is that we do not name inmates, but they are recognisable enough. Australia’s most notorious serial killer is here. The fearsome muscles and piercing black eyes that terrified his seven known victims in their last moments are gone. More than 20 years into his sentence, he’s an old man now. He is sitting at a concrete desk writing letters, something he does incessantly. He mops the floors for extra milk rations. In any other jail he’d be just another sad old crim seeing out the years, but here in the SuperMax he looks oddly out of place. It says much about the transformation of SuperMax from high-risk prison to holding pen for Muslim ­radicals that not even the serial killers fit in. Piazza says this prisoner would normally be up on Deck Eight, but they brought him down here because he’s been doing it tough. Some break.

In the cell next to him is a rangy Lebanese boy with a mohawk haircut and a chest full of tatts. I recognise him, too. In April last year he was moved from Kempsey Prison to the SuperMax after he bashed his cellmate, doused him in ­boiling water and carved “E4E” (eye for an eye) into his forehead. His victim was a former ­Australian army reservist and it’s believed this was an ISIS-inspired attack. Certainly it was enough to get him transferred to SuperMax, where he has since been charged with plotting a terror attack on Bankstown Police ­Station. He also allegedly threatened to cut off the head of Peter Severin, the NSW Corrective ­Services Commissioner. He sweeps the floor and glowers at us malevolently.

A few cells down is a young man at the centre of Australia’s biggest terrorism plot. He was arrested in September 2014 over an alleged conspiracy to abduct and behead a random member of the ­public. “Why don’t you report the truth and that’s the oppression of your so-called government,” he yells through the glass. There is a lot of this. In the minds of most inmates there is no difference between a targeted military campaign and cutting a bloke’s head off in Sydney’s Martin Place. If anything, they think the former is worse.


Visits like this are rare in SuperMax and already the prisoners are getting toey. Young men with bushy Salafist beards press their faces against the heavy safety glass in their cell doors. Before long the shouting starts. “Power to Islam!” “The truth shall set you free!” and “Allahu Akbar!” Piazza can feel the ­tension rising; you’d have to be made of granite not to. He doesn’t want the inmates too riled up – it creates problems for staff later in the day. We move on.

Deck Eight is quieter. The prisoners here are older and less excited by our visit. SuperMax rules allow prisoners to consort with no more than one inmate at a time so some are in pairs wandering in and out of each other’s cells. I peer through one cell door and see a man in his 40s sitting alone on his bed reading from a sheaf of papers. He tugs at his beard and makes notes with a pen. On the outside he ran a recruitment network for al-Qa’ida, funnelling dozens of young radicals into the maw of the ­Syrian jihad. To the cops he was an A-grade coward, content to send countless young Australians to their deaths but lacking the ­bottle to jump on a plane himself. I’m told he wept uncontrollably when he arrived in SuperMax. He sees us and raises a single hand in greeting.

Prisoners spend at least 16 hours a day in their cells. They eat in them, shower in them, defecate in them. They can have a radio, TV and kettle. No internet. Depending on their behaviour they might be allowed into the exercise yard where they can play handball, basketball or work out on the chin-up bars. If they’re really good they get access to the running track at the centre of the complex. The track’s small but hard to miss. It’s slathered in netting to stop contraband being hurled in – or a helicopter landing.

Security is an obsession inside SuperMax. When prisoners first arrive they are stripped naked and placed in an observation cell. Their entire body is x-rayed using a so-called “boss chair”, a throne-like device that fires x-rays at the head, feet, torso and rectum, the cavity of choice for those wishing to smuggle contraband past the officers. Piazza says that over the years staff have retrieved knives, drugs and phones, which are a valuable commodity in prison. “The best one I’ve seen is a phone and a charger,” he says. “That was in 2006. Imagine how big the phone was.”

Prisoners sit in the boss chair after every visit or court appearance. They move cells every 28 days and when they move through the prison they are accompanied by a minimum of two guards. When their relatives or solicitors visit they must sit, Hannibal Lecter-style, in sealed Perspex boxes, so-called “safe interview spaces”. Their mail is read, scanned and stored. Their conversations with visitors are live-monitored. Conversations in languages other than English are banned.

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Reply #5 - Dec 29th, 2017 at 6:17am
 
pt 3.

This is how SuperMax works. Not with muscle or threats but with a rigid adherence to rules and discipline. Strip a life down to its rudiments, take away a man’s contact with the outside world, his possessions, his freedom, force him to seek permission if he wants to hold his wife’s hand during a visit – narrow his life to the point where the most exciting thing that can happen in six months is a visit from a journalist – and you don’t need phone books or rubber hoses to keep order. All you need is extra milk rations.

It wasn’t supposed to be quite like this. When the Carr government opened SuperMax back in 2001, the plan was for a maximum security prison that would be used to house the state’s most ­difficult offenders. Escapees, psychopaths, crime bosses – this was SuperMax’s core business. Then came 9/11 and, more than a decade later, the age of ISIS. A prison that had been built to handle the system’s toughest crooks became a holding pen for Muslim ­terrorists, the most radical square mile in all of Australia. “We’ve got a completely different set of inmates than in the main jail,” says Scott Ryan, SuperMax’s head of intelligence. “There’s very little violence. They’re a lot smarter.”

Working in SuperMax is uniquely stressful for staff. The inmates hate them, calling them ­kuffars or dogs. Some won’t even talk to the female staff. As we are leaving, one of the officers tells us: “I don’t want my ­picture. I’ve got a family.”


But as dangerous as these men are, there is a growing view that many do not belong in the SuperMax. Increasingly, experts are questioning the wisdom of housing young offenders in the same facility as older, die-hard extremists. ­Australian National University deradicalisation expert Dr Clarke Jones says SuperMax is the right place for violent, difficult prisoners but the wrong place for younger inmates who might, under the right circumstances, be separated from their ­radical ideologies. In Victoria, he adds, radical inmates are spread throughout the system.“

There’s a long history of psychological evidence that it becomes more difficult to rehabilitate prisoners over the age of 25,” Jones says. “But under 25, there’s a good chance.” Vocational ­training, religious counselling and physical contact with their family – these are the elements that need to be in place if younger inmates are to be diverted from radicalism. “Virtually none of that is available in SuperMax.”

And SuperMax’s population is getting younger, much younger. Across the fence in Goulburn jail proper, the prison population is divided by race or religion. There is a Muslim yard, an Islander yard, an Aboriginal yard and an Asian yard. Multi­culturalism might work in the real world but in ­Goulburn it is segregation that keeps the peace.

In SuperMax, the division is even simpler: al-Qa’ida and Islamic State. The older, sentenced prisoners support al-Qa’ida. The younger ones, energised by the Syrian jihad, support Islamic State. Two tribes. They don’t get along.


“They really have nothing to do with each other,” Ryan tells me. “They’ll be polite to each other. The older fellas will look at [them] as young punks – ‘they know nothing about the Koran, they know nothing about our struggles’ and all of this. The younger ones will look at the older ones, ‘Oh, these old ­has-beens. This is the new way. All that stuff’s out now.’ There’s a big division in that.” Al-Qa’ida supporters are held in Unit Eight, where the average age of prisoners is 35. Islamic State supporters are in Unit Nine, where the ­average age is just 21.

The al-Qa’ida terrorists sentenced after 9/11 are starting to come up for parole. A few are already out. Khaled ­Sharrouf did a brief spell in SuperMax after he was convicted over his involvement in the 2005 terror plot to bomb targets in Sydney and Melbourne. It didn’t do much good. In 2013 Sharrouf fled for Syria, where he was last seen brandishing severed heads and executing Iraqi officials in the sands outside Mosul.

In August this year, Bilal Khazal, a 46-year-old former baggage handler convicted of making a terrorist training manual, will chance his arm before the parole board. There is a reasonable prospect he will get out. In early 2019, Ahmad Naizmand, a 22-year-old convicted of breaching a terrorism control order, will do the same. The others will start dribbling out in the years after that. I ask Ryan how many remain hard-core radicals. He thinks for a moment. “You could probably put on the one hand the ones that aren’t.”


New federal government laws that would allow authorities to detain unrepentant extremists beyond the term of their sentence would, in ­theory, apply to many of SuperMax’s inhabitants. NSW Corrective Services Commissioner Severin says that, as it stands, virtually all of ­SuperMax’s sentenced terrorists would be candidates for the new sanction. But the legislation is untested. Besides, there are 30 Muslim extremists in ­SuperMax. Locking them all up indefinitely is not a realistic option, not if you want to avoid turning SuperMax into Guantanamo Bay. At some point they’re going to rejoin the community.

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Reply #6 - Dec 29th, 2017 at 6:19am
 
Quote:
Multi­culturalism might work in the real world but in ­Goulburn it is segregation that keeps the peace.


Ah yes, reality vs propaganda...  multiculti "might work in the real world"...  but in reality, we all know that it doesn't.
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Reply #7 - Dec 29th, 2017 at 6:26am
 
pt 4.

Corrective Services NSW offers a voluntary deradicalisation program, the Proactive Integrated Support Model or PRISM, but it is aimed at those at risk of radicalisation, not those already in its grip. Of the 13,000 prisoners in NSW jails, about 20 are signed up to the program. It is hard to know how effective PRISM is, but if it is like any other deradicalisation program the answer is, probably, not very.

The rise of Islamic State has spawned a multi-­billion-dollar industry in so-called “countering violent extremism” programs. None claims a ­convincing success rate; most are abject failures. None of this is news to Piazza. “Nobody in the world knows what to do with these guys,” he says.

For the older terrorists, the point is moot. They’re too far gone. A few won’t talk to the staff anymore, let alone participate in deradicalisation programs. In the years he’s spent walking the corridors of SuperMax, Piazza has seen little evidence the men in his charge are ready to change. “When someone gets to that age of 40, they go, ‘F..k, you know what? I’ve had enough of this poo.’ Well, now we’re getting guys who are 50-51 years of age and they’re still going.” I ask Ryan what would happen if the older ones were thrown in with the general prison population. “They’d recruit. Simple as that.”

But for the younger ones, the picture is different. Ryan estimates that if all the unsentenced prisoners in SuperMax were released tomorrow, around half would never touch a Koran again: “They’re not that committed to the cause.” He thinks some of the younger prisoners might shed their extremist ideology if they could be separated from the older, harder ideologues early into their sentence. He describes what it’s like when prisoners first arrive in SuperMax. “They’ll be down in Unit Seven all by themselves and you can talk to them there,” he says. “After that ­initial shock, they’re polite. Then you get them up to the other deck with other influences and that’s when you lose them.”

Severin acknowledges the challenges of trying to rehabilitate hardened jihadis inside the SuperMax but to him the priority is clear. “For me, the responsibility to the rest of the system and the broader community, and national security for that matter, outweighs the negative effects that the concentration of those individuals might have.”

He has hinted this will change in the future. Last year ­Severin said Corrective ­Services NSW was examining a “differentiated” placement ­system, one that could see radical inmates separated. A report by NSW Inspector of Custodial Services Fiona Rafter, who was tasked last year with examining prison radicalisation, is likely to make similar recommendations. ­Corrective Services is also looking at a system that will allow radical inmates to be moved downward through the system prior to release.

Severin says that outside the SuperMax there is no widespread problem of radicalisation across the prison system, and by all accounts he is right. Of the 13,000 inmates confined in NSW, there have been just four confirmed cases where inmates have been radicalised, he says. That’s almost certainly an underestimate, but it’s hard to make the case that the prison system is teeming with murderous jihadis. When we visit the Muslim yard in Goulburn jail proper, the inmates make a show of praying but seem far more interested in horsing around for the cameras. This isn’t to make light of their beliefs or be naive about their crimes, but it seems anything but a hotbed of radical preaching. In two days wandering the yards of Goulburn they are the friendliest bunch of blokes we meet.

But as SuperMax starts disgorging its inmates, the risk to the community will be profound.
None of this is the fault of Piazza and his staff. They are not social workers. They are prison officers whose job is to protect the community, something they do exceptionally well and under the most trying conditions. But thinking of the rangy Lebanese boy with the chest full of tatts prowling his cell like a caged animal, it is difficult not to believe we are kicking the can down the road. What happens when we get to the end?

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Reply #8 - Dec 29th, 2017 at 6:29am
 
RADICALISATION, SCHMADICALISATION... THERE IS NO SUCH THING, IT'S SIMPLY AN EXCUSE FOR BAD BEHAVIOUR...  "OH I'VE BEEN RADICALISED, IT'S NOT MY FAULT..."  WHAT A LOAD OF BULLSHYT... ITS YOUR FAULT. YOUR FAMILY'S FAULT AND YOUR COMMUNITY'S FAULT.  ISLAM IS AT FAULT...
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Re: Multiculti - the politics and policy killing Oz.
Reply #9 - Dec 29th, 2017 at 6:40am
 
Went 4wd yesterday , good fun
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JuLiars prediction Mar 8 2017
Trend is for Labor to go down the drain'
Labor win WA, QLD,VIC increased majority Smiley
 
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Reply #10 - Dec 29th, 2017 at 6:53am
 
all -isms are at fault in the killing of this nation.....
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“Facts are stubborn things; and whatever may be our wishes, our inclinations, or the dictates of our passion, they cannot alter the state of facts and evidence.”
― John Adams
 
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Reply #11 - Dec 29th, 2017 at 8:35am
 
Have you noted the deliberate absence of a certain avid poster in this factual statement on the stupidity of our grubberment?

The tsk tsk, and ad hominem statement
The screaming of islamaphobes
The desperate cry of racist

These are the tools of a tool who is either so divorced from reality (living in his made up world" or evidence that he is a plant for those who have vowed to destroy civilization and all the good in it.

No
I am not naive enough to think or believe that Australia was or ever would be perfect, after all, just look at what passes for our politicians.
How can any country excell with this crop of openly corrupt imbeciles.

But without importing this human feaces from third world countries that are beyond saving is antithetical to common sense.

We must stop it NOW
We must rid ourselves of this self destruction through complying with a UNITED NATIONS shoes members are predominantly Islamic bias and third world focused.

If they continue, first world countries will not be able to support charity to these third world cesspits .

OR is that perhaps the agenda.
Stop the aid and watch these third world cesspits  self destruct.

Then perhaps we could weed out the diseased PARASITES and the world will be a much better place.
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I HAVE A DREAM
A WONDERFUL, PEACEFUL, BEAUTIFUL DREAM.
A DREAM OF A WORLD THAT HAS NEVER KNOWN ISLAM
A DREAM OF A WORLD FREE FROM THE HORRORS OF ISLAM.

SUCH A WONDERFUL DREAM
O HOW I WISH IT WERE TRU
 
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Reply #12 - Dec 29th, 2017 at 9:56am
 
Inside Australia’s ‘Super mosque’ prison where guards fear radical Muslims are plotting terrorist acts

Candace Sutton
April 1, 20175:55pm

WHEN more than 30 Muslim inmates get down on their prayer mats inside Goulburn’s Supermax prison and bow towards Mecca, it doesn’t much bother serial killer Ivan Milat.

As Ivan revealed in exclusive letters to news.com.au, he is one of just a handful of non-Muslim prisoners inside Australia’s most secure jail.

The seven times backpacker killer keeps to himself and leaves the convicted radical terrorists to their own, catered for by special prison diets, prison issue green prayer mats and copies of the Koran and the freedom to pray five times a day.

“Any special diets, Muslims etc. are catered for,” Milat told news.com.au.  “No guess work on that, once a person declares himself a Muslim then he always issued the religious friendly meals.

“Buy-ups cater for all cultures. The Muslims are entrenched in here only because they are here, they act no different in here or anywhere else.”

Not all the extremist Muslims in the High Risk Management Correctional Centre, Supermax’s official name, were convicted of plotting terrorist acts.

Some of them are murderers and originally from Christian families, who converted to Islam behind bars.


But as The Australian reported, Islam has become an obsession for the violent inmates who practice the religion inside Supermax.

For this reason Supermax, a jail inside NSW”s grimmest correctional complex 195km southwest of Sydney, is often referred to as
“Super mosque”.


And as the national newspaper exclusively revealed, even the state’s prisons commissioner Peter Severin acknowledges that Supermax and its majority of inmates who are either convicted of terrorism offences or on remand awaiting trial, is a hotbed of radical Islam.

Mr Severin has recommended new laws be drawn up to detain up to 11 convicted terrorists beyond their prison terms.  Living inside Supermax — which has three separate units that house cells with have common day rooms shared by two or three inmates — are members of the 2005 Pendennis terrorist plot, and the newer wave of ISIS-inspired extremists.

But Supermax’s prisoner population also includes the most dangerous and cunning inmates in the country, who are considered likely to try to escape or to harm prison guards or bash other criminals.

The inmates have included Brothers 4 Life gang leader Bassam Hamzy, his gang rival Farhad Qaumi, and violent and unpredictable prisoner, Martin Toki, who is serving a minimum 22 years for his wife’s 2001 murder.

Execution style murderer Leith Marchant, serving 38 years, converted to Islam inside jail and became so radical that he shunned his mattress to sleep on bare concrete.


Supermax has 171 surveillance cameras and inmates are monitored 24 hours a day, seven days a week, inside their cold 3 metre by 4 metre cells.

To further reduce risk of escape attempts and violence, inmates are shuffled between cells every few weeks, they are X-rayed regularly and so is their food.

Ivan Milat, now aged 72 and who will die in jail, revealed that the atmosphere in Supermax is fairly calm because prison officers realise they have to keep the violent murderers on an even keel.  “Fairly ordinary most of the time,” Milat said, “management-keepers seemly realise it’s best to respect everyone then all is calm.

“They seemly (sic) vet the rednecks to watch their attitude in here.  “In reality in this unit, I’m the only odd one out, as they all associate with each other.”  But it is that association which may prove risky in the future when members of the Pendennis plot are inevitably released.

Nine Sydney and eight Melbourne men were arrested as part of Operation Pendennis, then Australia’s largest counter-terrorism investigation which broke up two jihadi cells with weapons, bomb-making equipment and plans for attacks in the state capitals.
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Reply #13 - Dec 29th, 2017 at 10:13am
 
Quote:
Jailhouse jihad: Violent inmates forcing prison conversions to Islam

Candace Sutton
June 30, 20171:37pm

VIOLENT and dangerous inmates are trying to force other prisoners in some of Australia’s worst prisons to convert to Islam against their will.

The forcible conversions created such tension in one NSW jail that inmates began fighting each other in the prison yard, ABC News has reported.

The NSW Corrective Services documents obtained by the ABC also reveal that inmates seen as extreme high risk security threats are also being released into the community.

The documents do not state which prison the attempted Islamic conversion ended in a melee which was broken up by prison officers last year.


Inside NSW jails: Inmates trying to force religion, extreme ideologies onto others

By Greg Miskelly and freedom of information editor Michael McKinnon
29 Jun 2017, 1:33pm

Prisoners are attempting to forcibly convert their fellow inmates to religion against their will, internal Corrective Services documents show.
Key points:

    Report says prisoners who are extreme threats are being released into the community
    Documents do not explain whether high-risk inmates are monitored when on parole
    Isolation of violent inmates is sometimes the only way to protect security staff and visitors


ABC News has obtained New South Wales Government documents detailing a fight that broke out over religious lines in a Corrective Services facility last year.

The report notes the trigger was a group of prisoners attempting to forcibly "convert non-Muslim inmates to Islam".

The documents, which are censored in sections, were obtained under the GIPA Act and do not detail the specific Corrective Services facility.

They said quick intervention by prison staff appeared to have "broken up" the melee "before it could get out of hand".

The incident report provides a rare glimpse of the challenges faced by Corrective Services staff, who manage large groups of dangerous inmates, some seeking to indoctrinate others with radical views and extremist ideologies.

Prisoners seen as extreme threats while behind bars are still being released into the community, according to the documents.

ABC News has obtained operational procedures detailing the different categories and threats associated with dangerous inmates, including terrorists and members of bikie gangs.

A Corrective Services spokesperson confirmed there were 34 inmates in NSW who have been convicted of or charged with national security offences, designated as either a Extreme High Risk Restricted (EHHR) — the state's highest designation — or National Security Interest (NSI).

The documents also explain discharge procedures, which confirm inmates with an "Active Extreme Threat Inmate (ETI)" status are sometimes released from jail.  Know a violent extremist? The Government wants you to call this helpline


A new phone and online support service for those who are worried people they know may be at risk of radicalisation or violent extremism has finally been launched.

Corrective Services Commissioner Peter Severin said laws had recently been changed to ensure dangerous inmates were not granted parole.

Commissioner Severin said it would be "logical" for similar laws to apply to inmates who remained an extreme threat at the time of their release.

"I think it would only be logical to have continued detention powers, through legislation, where courts can make those decisions, like we already have with sexual offenders and extreme violent offenders," he said.

The documents do not explain whether high-risk inmates are tracked or monitored in the community by either intelligence agencies or police surveillance after their release.

In a statement, Corrective Services confirmed it engages with "various State and Federal Government agencies to develop programs and services" to target "high-risk offenders" and that it is working to "enhance its capabilities in this area".

Earlier this month, NSW Premier Gladys Berejiklian announced a $47 million suite of new anti-radicalisation measures, including the creation of 30 extra Supermax places and an extreme security unit to house dangerous inmates inside Goulburn jail.

The documents outline a suite of policies and procedures for prison staff to assess, manage and attempt to reintegrate dangerous inmates.

This can include monitoring and recording of calls, mail and visitor conversations — including those in languages other than English.

    "Then the practice is to disperse them ... to engage with them, to deradicalise," Commissioner Severin said.

"If that does not work, then we obviously need to consider the most secure way of managing them in our system."

Dangerous behaviour is managed with a system of verbal and written warnings, behaviour management plans and ongoing security reviews by prison staff, including intelligence experts.

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Re: Multiculti - the politics and policy killing Oz.
Reply #14 - Dec 29th, 2017 at 10:16am
 
pt 2.

While a range of counselling and psychological programs are available as treatment options, the documents suggest the isolation of the most extreme, violent inmates in High Risk Management Correctional Centres is sometimes the only way to ensure the security of staff, prisoners and other visitors.

CATEGORY/THREAT

Extreme High Risk Restricted Inmates (EHHR)      Extreme danger to other people, extreme threat to good order and security, and poses risk inmate may engage in, or incite others to engage in activities that constitute a "serious threat to the peace, order good government of the state".

Extreme High Security Inmate (EHS)      Extreme danger to other people.

High Security Inmate (HS)      Danger to other people, threat to good order and security.

National Security Interest Inmate (NSI)      Risk may engage in, or incite others to engage in activities that constitute a "serious threat to the peace, order good government of the state", but who may not have necessarily been charged with terrorism-related offences.

Extreme Threat Inmate (ETI)      Propensity for violence, assault, stand-over tactics, intimidation, and disruptive behaviour, individually or within a group. Includes inmates who are EHRR/ NSI, outlaw motorcycle gangs, organised crime network members and any offenders who the commissioner considers is an extreme threat.


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