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Poll closed Poll
Question: Do you regularly watch the Dubyne videos Booby posts?
*** This poll has now closed ***


Never    
  3 (42.9%)
Saw one—was quite enough    
  3 (42.9%)
Sometimes watch—sort of interesting    
  0 (0.0%)
Watch a lot—I believe the LIA stuff    
  0 (0.0%)
Watch every video, pretty much    
  1 (14.3%)




Total votes: 7
« Created by: Jovial Monk on: Feb 21st, 2017 at 9:42am »

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New Ice Age.. (Read 52220 times)
Valkie
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Re: New Ice Age..
Reply #15 - Jun 2nd, 2016 at 7:54pm
 
Perhaps the climate scientists can explain why its cooling down???

Oh Thats right .........they cant Cheesy Cheesy Cheesy Cheesy Cheesy Cheesy Cheesy Cheesy Cheesy Cheesy Cheesy Cheesy Cheesy Cheesy Cheesy Cheesy Cheesy Cheesy Cheesy Cheesy Cheesy Cheesy Cheesy Cheesy Cheesy Cheesy Cheesy Cheesy Cheesy Cheesy Cheesy Cheesy
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Pecca has admitted that terrorists are and anyone who promotes, condones, praises or apologises for terrorists or its acts is also mentally ill.
Including sympathisers and apologists.
 
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Sir Bobby
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Re: New Ice Age..
Reply #16 - Jun 2nd, 2016 at 9:13pm
 
Valkie wrote on Jun 2nd, 2016 at 7:54pm:
Perhaps the climate scientists can explain why its cooling down???

Oh Thats right .........they cant


Many scientists have ignored the fact that our sun is a variable star.
It has very quiet periods that can last 10 to 70 years or more.
These quiet periods when coincidentally are synchronised with volcanic eruptions
can cause a mini ice age as happened during the last Maunder Minimum.


It doesn't mean that it's OK to release more CO2 into our atmosphere because
when the mini ice age is over the temperatures
could rise to unbearable levels.
This may happen as early as 2030 -  less than 14 years away!
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Extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence.
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Re: New Ice Age..
Reply #17 - Jun 3rd, 2016 at 7:04am
 
bump
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Laugh till you cry
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Re: New Ice Age..
Reply #18 - Jun 3rd, 2016 at 1:43pm
 
Quite the reverse of an ice age is happening. The arctic tundra is turning green as the temperature rises:

...

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-3622480/The-incredible-image-show...

Quote:
The shocking image that shows exactly how global warming is turning the Arctic tundra green

What was once Arctic tundra in the cold plains of North America is now blooming, new Nasa images have revealed.
Researchers analysed 87,000 images taken between 1984 and 2012 by Landsat satellites in the most detailed look yet at plant life across Alaska and Canada.

It found the northern reaches of North America are getting greener, and almost a third of the land cover – much of it Arctic tundra – is looking more like landscapes found in warmer ecosystems. 

The new Landsat study further supports previous work that has shown changing vegetation in Arctic and boreal North America.
Landsat is a joint NASA/U.S. Geological Survey program that provides the longest continuous space-based record of Earth's land vegetation in existence.

'It shows the climate impact on vegetation in the high latitudes,' said Jeffrey Masek, a researcher who worked on the study and the Landsat 9 project scientist at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland.
Temperatures are warming faster in the Arctic than elsewhere, which has led to longer seasons for plants to grow in and changes to the soils.

Scientists have observed grassy tundras changing to shrublands, and shrubs growing bigger and denser – changes that could have impacts on regional water, energy and carbon cycles.

With Landsat 5 and Landsat 7 data, Masek and his colleague Junchang Ju, a remote sensing scientist at Goddard, found that there was extensive greening in the tundra of western Alaska, the northern coast of Canada, and the tundra of Quebec and Labrador.

While northern forests greened in Canada, they tended to decline in Alaska.
Overall, the scientists found that 29.4 percent of the region greened up, especially in shrublands and sparsely vegetated areas, while 2.9 percent showed vegetation decline.

'The greening trend was unmistakable,' the researchers wrote in an April 2016 paper in Remote Sensing of Environment.
Previous surveys of the vegetation had taken a big-picture view of the region using coarse-resolution satellite sensors.
To get a more detailed picture of the 4.1 million square-mile area, scientists used the Landsat 5 and Landsat 7 satellites.
Landsat, like other satellite missions, can use the amount of visible and near-infrared light reflected by the green, leafy vegetation of grasses, shrubs and trees to characterize the vegetation.

The changing tundra: Left, Dan Hodkinson, a field operations manager with NASA’s Carbon Cycle and Ecosystems Office, and other NASA researchers hike to remote locations to measure the condition of vegetation in the Arctic tundra of Canada's Northwest Territories. Right, the view from a plane that is carrying instruments to measure the health of vegetation in the Arctic tundra of the Northwest Territories of Canada.

Then, with computer programs that track each individual pixel of data over time, researchers can see if an area is greening – if more vegetation is growing, or if individual plants are getting larger and leafier.
If, however, the vegetation becomes sparser, the scientists would classify that area as browning.
Researchers have used similar techniques to study Arctic and northern vegetation with other satellite instruments, such as the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR).

But Landsat can see smaller differences across a landscape – it takes one measurement for each 30-by-30 meter (98-by-98 foot) parcel of land, which is about the size of a baseball diamond. AVHRR collected one measurement for each 4-by-4 kilometer (2.5-by-2.5 mile) area.

'We can see more detail with Landsat, and we can see the trend more reliably,' Ju said.
With finer-resolution and better calibrated data from Landsat, the researchers were able to mask out areas that burned, or are covered in water, to focus on vegetation changes.

The more detailed look – now available to other researchers as well – will also let scientists see if a correlation exists between habitat characteristics and greening or browning trends.
NASA study finds the arctic is changing, becoming greener

'The resolution with Landsat is drastically improved, it lets you look at the local effects of things like topography, such as in areas where you might have small woodlands or open areas,' Masek said.
'You can do detailed studies of how climate impacts vary with geography.'
Adding the Landsat study to previous studies using the AVHRR sensor also adds to the certainty of what's going on, Masek said.

While the two tools to measure the northern vegetation did produce different results in some places, overall the trend was the similar – more plants, or bigger plants, in the Arctic reaches of North America.

With the higher resolution Landsat data, the researchers also found a lot of differences within areas – one pixel would be brown, and its neighbors green, noted Ju.
'It's very localized,' he said.

'The vegetation is responding to the microclimates. That's the benefit of using Landsat data...
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Please don't thank me. Effusive, fawning, obeisance of disciples, mendicants and foot-kissers embarrasses.
 
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lee
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Re: New Ice Age..
Reply #19 - Jun 3rd, 2016 at 6:10pm
 
Laugh till you cry wrote on Jun 3rd, 2016 at 1:43pm:
The arctic tundra is turning green as the temperature rises:



You mean something like what happened about 1780 when they crossed the Arctic Ocean from West to East? Wink

The Tundra is turning green? The "ice desert"? CO2 is greening the deserts just like the CSIRO and others have said? How shocking?
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Re: New Ice Age..
Reply #20 - Jun 4th, 2016 at 8:15am
 
This was last winter -
what shall we expect this winter as the new mini ice age hits us even harder?

http://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2015/jul/17/rare-snow-in-australia-as-...
Quote:
Rare snow in Australia as Antarctic chill sweeps eastern states

Temperatures have plummeted to more than 10 degrees below average in places, while Sydney has had its coldest July weather in 44 years

Snow has fallen in parts of Australia where such falls are so rare the weather bureau does not have the tools to measure it as temperatures plunged to more than 10 degrees below average.

Antarctic air pushed up through central New South Wales and on to Queensland – known as the Sunshine State – over the past week bringing on a winter cold front not seen in some parts since the mid-1980s.

In Queensland, snow fell in Stanthorpe, Eukey and on the south east border with NSW, but Bureau of Meteorology (Bom) forecaster Gorrdon Banks said the bureau was having trouble measuring it.

“We don’t actually measure the depth of snow fall, it’s so rare here in Queensland that really all we have to go on are rain gauges,” he said.

“We didn’t really have any official observations that snow was recorded, just reports from the public and just from the vision, I think we can say it was in the range of 2 to 5cm [one to two inches].”

Queensland has not seen snowfall such as this since 1984 and it has also recorded some of it lowest temperatures for July in more than 30 years with some areas near the border dropping to -4 degrees (24.8 °F).
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Re: New Ice Age..
Reply #21 - Jun 4th, 2016 at 10:06am
 
lee wrote on Jun 3rd, 2016 at 6:10pm:
You mean something like what happened about 1780 when they crossed the Arctic Ocean from West to East?


On foot?
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Please don't thank me. Effusive, fawning, obeisance of disciples, mendicants and foot-kissers embarrasses.
 
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Re: New Ice Age..
Reply #22 - Jun 4th, 2016 at 11:23am
 
The Mechanic wrote on May 31st, 2016 at 7:45pm:
gees.. haven't the Global Warming Nutters gone quiet..  Roll Eyes


Valkie wrote on Jun 2nd, 2016 at 7:54pm:
Perhaps the climate scientists can explain why its cooling down???
Oh Thats right .........they cant


Sir Bobby wrote on Jun 2nd, 2016 at 5:55pm:
My car had frost over all the windows this  morning.
I have never seen this on the first few days of June in Melbourne.


Instead of looking at a brief local cold snap of weather it would be more enlightening to look at Autumn as a whole.

Quote:
Australia in autumn 2016

Australia's warmest autumn on record
Highest on record temperatures throughout much of eastern and northern Australia
Prolonged March heatwave affected many parts of Australia

Autumn was very warm for most of Australia: southern Western Australia was the only part of the country where autumn temperatures tended to be average or below average. There were large areas of warmest on record covering eastern and northern Australia. Mean temperatures were more than three degrees warmer than average in some inland regions.
http://www.bom.gov.au/climate/current/season/aus/summary.shtml
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The Right Wing only believe in free speech when they agree with what is being said.
 
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Re: New Ice Age..
Reply #23 - Jun 4th, 2016 at 11:30am
 
Barnacle - you just ignored my evidence from last winter:


Sydney has had its coldest July weather in 44 years
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Re: New Ice Age..
Reply #24 - Jun 4th, 2016 at 12:48pm
 
Sir Bobby wrote on Jun 4th, 2016 at 11:30am:
Sydney has had its coldest July weather in 44 years


Yes you are right. I do ignore the weather in Sydney
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The Right Wing only believe in free speech when they agree with what is being said.
 
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Re: New Ice Age..
Reply #25 - Jun 4th, 2016 at 1:14pm
 
Hi all, haven't been on for a while, as hubby and I travelled the globe a bit, mainly Canada, Alaska and California.

Basically, went to see quite a few rocky mountains, in Canada, the Columbian Icefields (shrinking very rapidly), in Alaska, the Menendall Glacier (shrinking more rapidly since the 1970's) and Dawes Glacier, via ship doing a 360 deg turn, and so many scattered little icebergs breaking and floating away from that Glacier.

We went to Skagway, 6000 ft up where they train the sled dogs, to have them used to the cold, and why was it so damned warm, the whole time we were in Canada, and Alaska?
Many of us on the tour, complained as we didn't bring much in the way of 'summer' clothing.  Cool

So what did I surmise from all this you may ask?

If this mini ice age is going to happen due to the quiet sun phase, then why are the glaciers shrinking as such?

Once you go there, and see it for yourselves, you feel very different about how this is happening.

I could come up with all sorts of stuff, and I could be partly wrong, and also, partly right.

Whilst all the glaciers are breaking apart, and receding, that is cooling the ocean down, and it must effect the rest of our atmospheric climate, hence when we came back to Melbourne, we froze!!
Go figure.

Keep an open mind about it all, I for one, am sad to see the photos of the Menendall Glacier (near Juneau - Alaska's capital city) from the 1950's to the 1970's having receded a certain amount, but since the 1970's at a very fast pace.

Food for thought?

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"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themsleves and wiser people so full of doubts".
~Bertrand Russell
 
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Re: New Ice Age..
Reply #26 - Jun 4th, 2016 at 1:16pm
 
Laugh till you cry wrote on Jun 4th, 2016 at 10:06am:
lee wrote on Jun 3rd, 2016 at 6:10pm:
You mean something like what happened about 1780 when they crossed the Arctic Ocean from West to East?


On foot?



I see you can't retain knowledge, so I will repeat it.

'Adolf Erik, Baron Nordenskiöld, in full Nils Adolf Erik, Baron Nordenskiöld (born November 18, 1832, Helsinki, Finland—died August 12, 1901, Dalbyö, Sweden) Swedish geologist, mineralogist, geographer, and explorer who sailed from Norway to the Pacific across the Asiatic Arctic, completing the first successful navigation of the Northeast Passage.'

'Sailing from Tromsø, Norway, aboard the steam vessel Vega on July 21, 1878, he reached Cape Chelyushkin, Siberia, roughly the midpoint of his journey, on August 19. From the end of September until July 18, 1879, the ship was frozen in near the Bering Strait. Resuming its course, the Vega reached Port Clarence, Alaska, on July 22 and returned to Europe by way of Canton (China), Ceylon (now Sri Lanka), and the Suez Canal.'

http://www.britannica.com/biography/Adolf-Erik-Baron-Nordenskiold

With NO icebreakers, no modern shipbuilding techniques, no modern engines,and no modern navigation.

Of course that is only the first recorded crossing, there may have been earlier ones, and this has been postulated.

'The Portuguese navigator David Melgueiro – according to some sources – would have made the first Northeast Passage complete crossing, from east to west, in 1660. '

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Northeast_Passage
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Re: New Ice Age..
Reply #27 - Jun 4th, 2016 at 1:29pm
 
lee wrote on Jun 4th, 2016 at 1:16pm:
Laugh till you cry wrote on Jun 4th, 2016 at 10:06am:
lee wrote on Jun 3rd, 2016 at 6:10pm:
You mean something like what happened about 1780 when they crossed the Arctic Ocean from West to East?


On foot?



I see you can't retain knowledge, so I will repeat it.

'Adolf Erik, Baron Nordenskiöld, in full Nils Adolf Erik, Baron Nordenskiöld (born November 18, 1832, Helsinki, Finland—died August 12, 1901, Dalbyö, Sweden) Swedish geologist, mineralogist, geographer, and explorer who sailed from Norway to the Pacific across the Asiatic Arctic, completing the first successful navigation of the Northeast Passage.'

'Sailing from Tromsø, Norway, aboard the steam vessel Vega on July 21, 1878, he reached Cape Chelyushkin, Siberia, roughly the midpoint of his journey, on August 19. From the end of September until July 18, 1879, the ship was frozen in near the Bering Strait. Resuming its course, the Vega reached Port Clarence, Alaska, on July 22 and returned to Europe by way of Canton (China), Ceylon (now Sri Lanka), and the Suez Canal.'

http://www.britannica.com/biography/Adolf-Erik-Baron-Nordenskiold

With NO icebreakers, no modern shipbuilding techniques, no modern engines,and no modern navigation.

Of course that is only the first recorded crossing, there may have been earlier ones, and this has been postulated.

'The Portuguese navigator David Melgueiro – according to some sources – would have made the first Northeast Passage complete crossing, from east to west, in 1660. '

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Northeast_Passage


Wowee! 13 month journey. Must have used rocket power.

Wait a minute!

"... From the end of September until July 18, 1879, the ship was frozen in near the Bering Strait... "

11 months trapped in ice? Why didn't they just walk? Probably quicker.
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« Last Edit: Jun 4th, 2016 at 1:44pm by Laugh till you cry »  

Please don't thank me. Effusive, fawning, obeisance of disciples, mendicants and foot-kissers embarrasses.
 
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Re: New Ice Age..
Reply #28 - Jun 4th, 2016 at 1:48pm
 
Darlings, some more facts for your consideration:

...

http://www.cbc.ca/news/technology/west-antarctic-vancouver-sized-ice-loss-1.3615...

Quote:
Part of the Antarctic's ice has shrunk by about 1,000 square kilometres over the last 40 years, according to a new study.

The study, released by the University of Edinburgh and the American Geophysical Union, also notes that the area around the West Antarctic Bellingshausen Sea has been losing ice for longer than previously thought.

The ice loss along the Bellingshausen Sea's coast is thought to be due to warm ocean water.

"Greater intensities of relatively warm, deep ocean water are accessing and rapidly melting the undersides of the ice shelves and glaciers along this coast, causing rapid grounding line retreat," the study's co-lead, Frazer Christie said.

The grounding line is the point where ice that rests on bedrock detaches and begins to float.

Christie said this is striking, because in Greenland and in other parts of the Antarctic, it is dramatically rising air temperatures that are causing snow and ice melt.

"Air temperatures over West Antarctica are still well below freezing and cannot, therefore, cause snow/ice melt and the changes we have observed," he said.

Unlike sea ice loss, which Christie said does not contribute to a rise in sea levels, shrinking grounding lines do.


"It represents the exact point where ice flowing seaward past this line directly contributes to sea-level rise," he explained.

The study is also significant because it sheds light on a part of the world that researchers really don't know much about.

The Bellingshausen Sea is difficult to study: it's home to year-round sea ice and heavy snow. Research vessels can't easily reach the ice-encased region, compared to the neighbouring and well-studied Amundsen Sea.

The researchers hope the study will help the scientific community better understand the reasons for ice loss in the Antarctic.
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Please don't thank me. Effusive, fawning, obeisance of disciples, mendicants and foot-kissers embarrasses.
 
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lee
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Re: New Ice Age..
Reply #29 - Jun 4th, 2016 at 1:51pm
 
Laugh till you cry wrote on Jun 4th, 2016 at 1:29pm:
Wowee! 13 month journey. Must have used rocket power.

Wait a minute!

"... From the end of September until July 18, 1879, the ship was frozen in near the Bering Strait... "

11 months trapped in ice?



Once again your mathematical skills are lacking. That's 9.5 months approximately.

You've never heard of Arctic winters?  And you expect that they won't vary in time from year to year? I am amazed.

You obviously don't understand Steamship technology, and all those other things I talked about, that they didn't have. I guess that comes from being a know nothing.
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